Reading Journal as A Way to Improve Students’ Comprehension toward A Textbook Reading Material

Authors

  • Menik Winiharti English Department, Faculty of Humanities, Bina Nusantara University Jln. Kemanggisan Ilir III, No. 45, Kemanggisan – Palmerah, Jakarta Barat 11480
  • Agnes Herawati English Department, Faculty of Humanities, Bina Nusantara University Jln. Kemanggisan Ilir III, No. 45, Kemanggisan – Palmerah, Jakarta Barat 11480
  • Esti Rahayu English Department, Faculty of Humanities, Bina Nusantara University Jln. Kemanggisan Ilir III, No. 45, Kemanggisan – Palmerah, Jakarta Barat 11480

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21512/lc.v8i2.449

Keywords:

reading journal, writing, reading comprehension

Abstract

Reading journal is one way to record students’ independent learning based on text they read. This study was conducted to find out the students’ level of reading comprehension through some notes written in the reading journal, the extent to which the activity of writing reading journals improved students’ reading comprehension, whether the students got benefit from reading journal. There were 104 respondents coming from four different departments in Bina Nusantara University were asked to read a text related to the subject they learned in a certain session. Then they were assigned to write a journal that records the things they had read. When this task was finished, the lecturer ran a quiz containing related questions to check whether they really understood the content of the text. Afterwards, students were to fill in a questionnaire regarding their opinion on the impact of the reading journal toward their reading comprehension. The findings indicate that more than half of the participants appear to understand the material well, and the task plays a certain role in improving students’ understanding. The most crucial thing is that most students think they get benefit by writing the reading journal.

References

Bean, J. C. (1996). Engaging ideas:The professor’s guide to integrating writing, critical thinking, and active learning in the classroom. San Fransisco: Jossey-Bass.

McIntosh, M.E. & Draper, R.J. (2001). Using learning logs in mathematics: Writing to learn. Mathematics Teacher, 94, 554–557.

McNamara, D. S. (2004). SERT: Self-explanation reading training. Discourse Processes, 38, 1–30. Routledge: Taylor and Francis group.

Murray, D. M. (1990). Writing to Learn. Texas: Holt, Rhinehart and Winston.

Rowan, K. E. (1990). Cognitive Correlates of Explanatory Writing Skill. Written Communication, 7(3), 316–341.

Scriven, M. & Paul, R. (1996). Defining Critical Thinking: A Draft Statement for the National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking. Retrieved from http://www.criticalthinking.org/University/univlibrary/library.nclk

Vacca, R. T. & Vacca J. A. L. (1999). Content Area Reading. Literacy and Learning across the Curriculum. 6th Ed. New York: Addison-Wesley.

Wilson, N. (1989). Learning from confusion: Questions and change in reading logs. English Journal, 78(7), 62–69.

Downloads

Published

2014-11-28
Abstract 996  .
PDF downloaded 974  .