A Case Study of Academic Writing Development Through Principled Versus Standard Clt Method at Binus University

Almodad Biduk Asmani

Abstract


The purpose of the research project is to investigate how far the academic writing skills of Binus University students can be developed through two conflicting CLT methods: standard and principled. The research project is expected to result in computer-animated format which can be used as one of the main tools in teaching and learning grammar at Binus University. The research project uses the qualitative approach, and thus uses verbal data. The research project involves two subject groups (experimental and control). The experimental group will receive the treatment of grammar learning by using the Principled CLT approach, while the control group receives the standard CLT approach. Survey is then conducted to the two groups so as to find out their comments on the two teaching methods. From the results of the questionnaires, it is found that Principled CLT method is favored for its knowledge and accuracy factors, while the Standard CLT is preferred for its fun and independence factors.

 

 

 


Keywords


academic writing skills, academic writing development, principled CLT method, standard CLT method

Full Text:

PDF

References


Ary, D., Jacobs, L. C., Razavieh, A., & Sorensen, C. (2006). Introduction to Research in Education. USA: Thomson Wadsworth.

Asmani, A. B. (2011) How do Binus undergraduate students value English under linguistics imperialism and macroacquisition influences? Its impacts on the ELT model (qualitative approach) Lingua Cultura, Vol. 6 (May 2012), 14.

Celce-Murcia, M., Dornyei, Z., & Thurrell, S. (1997). Direct approaches in L2 instruction: a turning point in communicative language teaching? TESOL Quarterly, 31 (1), 141 – 152

Cohen, L., Manion, L., et. al. (2000). Research Methods in Education. London: Routledge Farmer.

Joyce, H. S., and Burns, A. (1999). Focus on Grammar. National Centre for English Language Teaching and Research.

Savignon, S. J. (1990). Communicative language teaching: Definitions and directions. In J. E. Alatis (ed.), Goergetwon University Round Table on Language and Linguistics 1990 (pp. 205-217). Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.

Spada, N., & Lightbown, P. M. (1993). Instruction and the development of questions in the L2 classroom. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 15, 205-224.

Usher, R. (1996). A critique of neglected epistemological assumptions of educational research. In D. Scott and R. Usher (eds), Understanding educational research. London: Routledge.

Widdowson, H. G. (1989). Knowledge of language and ability for use. Applied Linguistics,10, 128-137




DOI: https://doi.org/10.21512/humaniora.v4i2.3514

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Visitor Statistic: click here!

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.